My Experience With ChipDrop–And a Lesson for All of Us

Yesterday morning, while browsing the free listings on craigslist, I saw an ad for free woodchips. I opened it and saw it was an ad for a website called ChipDrop where you can sign up to receive free woodchips from local tree service companies. As I read more about it, I saw that you can list any and all species you will not accept, choose whether or not you will accept logs in addition to chips, and that you are guaranteed to receive only one delivery per request (rather than coming home to discover 8 deliveries in your absence), and that the woodchips are guaranteed to be no more than 2 days old.

Read more…My Experience With ChipDrop–And a Lesson for All of Us

Monthly Project and Purchase Roundup: July 2017

The simplest project I completed this month was to mount my .22 caliber pellet rifle above the door from the kitchen to the back porch. This was in order to make it handy for shooting the rabbits that have been decimating my tomato plants. I went to Ace Hardware and bought 2 brass coat/hat hooks for a total of $10, and mounted them above the door. This has made it much easier to grab the pellet rifle when there is a rabbit in the garden.

Another project had to do with the chickens. We were steadily losing chickens–always during the day–with no sign of what was taking them. I bought some light plastic netting at True Value for a total of $55 and covered the entire pen. A few days later, I saw a black cat outside the pen, apparently foiled by the netting. I shot it with the pellet gun, and we haven’t lost a chicken since.

When I originally fenced the chicken pen, I used free welded wire fencing given to me by a friend that had moved. But at the chickens have grown, the space became insufficient, and too-heavy traffic meant that the grass was being destroyed. So when my wife saw several rolls of welded wire fencing and a dozen or so metal stakes on a Facebook buy/sell group for $35, I told her to get it. Using the new fencing, I came close to doubling the area the chickens can roam. Finally, I spent another $16 on another 50 lb bag of chick feed.

Read more…Monthly Project and Purchase Roundup: July 2017

12 Things Every Man Can Do to Improve the Nation and His Community

I’ve been thinking about what I can do to make a difference. My focus is not on reforming society from the top down, but from the bottom up. The survival of Christianity in Russia despite the years of Soviet persecution is an example of how regenerate families eventually destroy degenerate government. The fall of America into today’s cesspool of moral turpitude shows how degeneracy in families quickly leads to degeneracy in government. So here are 12 ways that you can have a positive impact on the nation and your community. None of them require you to be married or have children–these are things that can be done by anyone, no matter his situation.

Read more…12 Things Every Man Can Do to Improve the Nation and His Community

Weekly Project and Purchase Roundup, Week Ending 6/3/17

I’m late again, but better late than never, right? We’ll start with the purchases this past week. I spent $36 on Rhode Island Red chicks, which I ordered online from Tractor Supply Co. The minimum order is 10 chicks, so I ordered 10, but I received 12. 1 died after 2 days, but the other 11 have about doubled in size and seem healthy. I spent $100 at True Value on 2 chick feeders, 2 chick waterers, a scratch block, a 5 pound bag of dried mealworms, and a few bags of feed. I spent $25 at Wal-Mart for a large plastic tote with lid, which I drilled air holes in and use to house the chicks indoors at night.

Read more…Weekly Project and Purchase Roundup, Week Ending 6/3/17

Weekly Project and Purchase Roundup, 4/28/17

This week was extra productive due to having some extra time off of work.

A while back, I received a mailer from the Arbor Day Foundation offering me 10 Colorado Blue Spruce seedlings and 2 Lilac seedlings for a $10 donation. I am a big fan of lilacs, and so I sent them a check for $10. This week the seedlings arrived, so I spent a day digging and turning 12 3-foot diameter holes and planting my seedlings.

When we moved in last fall, there was a pile of plant debris in the back yard which I assumed was the burn pile. I added to it, then burnt it to the ground. I mentioned to the neighbor how badly located it was, and he told me it was the former owners’ garden–not burn pile. Who ever heard of an 8-foot diameter round garden? I moved the burn pile, but still had bare ground in this area until this week. I wheelbarrowed all the sod from the tree-planting here, and had almost enough to cover the bare patch.

Read more…Weekly Project and Purchase Roundup, 4/28/17